The history of Macaroon sisters

When Catherine de Vaudémont, daughter of Charles III Duke of Lorraine and the Abbess of Remiremont, founded the monastery of Les Dames du Saint-Sacrement in the centre of Nancy, strict rules banned eating meat. This meant that the sisters baked a wide range of pastries, including the famous Macaron ...

When the decree abolishing religious congregations came into force on 5 April 1792, Sisters Marguerite and Marie-Elisabeth took refuge in the home of Doctor Gormand, the community doctor, at 10 Rue de la Hache. In order to support themselves, they resumed making macaroons and marketed them. They were soon very well known and were called "Les Soeurs Macarons“ (“The Macaroon Sisters”)

In 1952, the City of Nancy honoured Les Soeurs Macarons by naming the part of Rue Hache where the genuine Nancy Macaroon was created after them. Since that date, the Sisters’ Macaroon has been part of the gastronomic heritage of the people of Lorraine - whether by birth or by choice!